Overriding replacement of double or triple hyphenation in WordPress

On here, I have posts with example commands that include double hyphens and they have been displayed merged together, something that has resulted in a comment posted by a visitor to this part of the web. All the while, I have been blaming the fonts that I have been using only for it to be the fault of WordPress itself.

Changing multiple dashes to something else has been a feature of Word autocorrect but I never expected to see WordPress aping that behaviour and it has been doing so for a few years now. The culprit is wptexturize and that cannot be disabled for it does many other useful things.

What happens is that the wptexturize filter changes ‘---‘ (double hyphens) to ‘–’ (– in web entity encoding) and ‘---‘ (triple hyphens) to ‘—’ (— in web entity encoding). The solution is to add another filter to the content that changes these back to the way they were and the following code does this:

add_filter( ‘the_content’ , ‘mh_un_en_dash’ , 50 );
function mh_un_en_dash( $content ) {
$content = str_replace( ‘–’ , ‘--‘ , $content );
$content = str_replace( ‘—’ , ‘---‘ , $content );
return $content;
}

The first line of the segment adds in the new filter that uses the function defined below it. The third and fourth lines above do the required substitution before the function returns the post content for display in the web page. The whole code block can be used to create a plugin or placed the theme’s functions.php file. Either way, things appear without the substitution confusing your readers. It makes me wonder if a bug report has been created for this because the behaviour looks odd to me.

Turning off push notifications in Firefox 46

A new feature came with Firefox 44 that only recently started to come to my notice with Yahoo Mail offering to set up browser notifications for every time when a new email arrives there. This is something that I did not need and yet I did not get the option to switch it off permanently for that website so I was being nagged every time I when to check on things for that email address, an unneeded irritation. Other websites offered to set up similar push notifications but you could switch these off permanently so it is a site by site function unless you take another approach.

That is to open a new browser tab and enter about:config in the address bar before hitting the return key. If you have not done this before, a warning message will appear but you can dismiss this permanently.  Once beyond that, you are presented with a searchable list of options and the ones that you need are dom.webnotifications.enabled and dom.webnotifications.serviceworker.enabled. By default, the corresponding entries in the Value column will be true. Double-clicking on each one will set it to false and you should not see any more offers of push notifications that allow you get alerts from web services like Yahoo Mail so your web browsing should suffer less of these intrusions.

Toggling the appearance or non-appearance of the Firefox session exit dialogue box

One thing that I notice with Firefox installations in both Ubuntu and Linux Mint is that a dialogue box appears when closing down the web browser asking whether to save the open session or if you want to have a fresh session the next time that you start it up. Initially, I was always in the latter camp but there are times when I took advantage of that session saving feature for retaining any extra tabs containing websites to which I want to return or editor sessions for any blog posts that I still am writing; sometimes, composing the latter can take a while.

To see where this setting is located, you need to open a new tab and type about:config in the browser’s address bar. This leads to advanced browser settings so you need click OK in answer to a warning message before proceeding. Then, start looking for browser.showQuitWarning using the Search bar; it acts like a dynamic filter on screen entries until you get what you need. On Ubuntu and Linux Mint, the value is set to true but false is the default elsewhere; unlike Opera, Firefox generally does not save sessions by fault unless you tell it to that (at least, that has been my experience anyway). Setting true to false or vice versa will control the appearance or non-appearance of the dialogue box at browser session closure time.

Turning off Advanced Content Filtering in CKEditor

On one of my websites, I use Textpattern with CKEditor for editing of articles on there. This was working well until I upgraded CKEditor to a version with a number of 4.1 or newer because it started to change the HTML in my articles when I did not want it to do so, especially when it broke the appearance of the things. A search on Google revealed an unhelpful forum exchange that produced no solution to the issue so I decided to share one on here when I found it.

What I needed to do was switch off what is known as Advanced Content Filtering. It can be tuned but I felt that would take too much time so I implemented something like what you see below in the config.js with the ckeditor folder:

CKEDITOR.editorConfig = function( config ) {
config.allowedContent = true;
};

All settings go with the outer function wrapper and setting the config.allowedContent property to true within there sorted my problem as I wanted. Now, any HTML remains untouched and I am happy with the outcome. It might be better for features like Advanced Content Filtering to be switched off by default and turned on by those with the time and need for it, much like the one of the principles adopted by the WordPress project. Still, having any off switch is better than none at all.

A collection of legal BitTorrent sites

It was an article in a magazine that revealed these legal BitTorrent download sites to me so I thought that I’d keep them on file for future reference while also sharing them with others who might need them. As far as I am aware, they are all legal in that no copyrighted material is on there. If that changes, I am happy to know and make amendments as needed.

My own interest in torrents arise from their being a convenient way to download installation disk images for Linux distributions and at least one of the entries is devoted to just that. However, the distribution also lends itself to movies along with music and books so that is reflected below too. With regard to downloading actual multimedia content, there is so much illegal downloading that a list like this is needed and has blackened the reputation of BitTorrent too because it only ever was conceived as a means for distributing large files in a peer-to-peer manner without the use of a single server. Of course, any use can be found for a technology and it never has to be legal or morally acceptable either.

Archive.org

BitTorrent Bundle

Bt.etree.org

Fanatics4Classics

FrostClick

Gameupdates.org

Legit Torrents

Linux Tracker

Public Domain Torrents

The Vuze Blog