Killing a hanging SSH session

My web hosting provider offers SSH access that I often use for such things as updating Matomo and Drupal together with more intensive file moving than an FTP session can support. However, I have found in recent months that I no longer can exit cleanly from such sessions using the exit command.

Because this produces a locked terminal session, I was keen to find an alternative to shutting down the terminal application before starting it again. Handily, there is a keyboard shortcut that does just what I need.

It varies a little according to the keyboard that you have. Essentially, it combines the carriage return key with ones for the tilde (~) and period (.) characters. The tilde may need to be produced by the combining the shift and backtick keys on some keyboard layouts but that is not needed on mine. So far, I have found that the <CR>+~+. combination does what I need until SSH sessions start exiting as expected.

Turning off push notifications in Firefox 46

A new feature came with Firefox 44 that only recently started to come to my notice with Yahoo Mail offering to set up browser notifications for every time when a new email arrives there. This is something that I did not need and yet I did not get the option to switch it off permanently for that website so I was being nagged every time I when to check on things for that email address, an unneeded irritation. Other websites offered to set up similar push notifications but you could switch these off permanently so it is a site by site function unless you take another approach.

That is to open a new browser tab and enter about:config in the address bar before hitting the return key. If you have not done this before, a warning message will appear but you can dismiss this permanently.  Once beyond that, you are presented with a searchable list of options and the ones that you need are dom.webnotifications.enabled and dom.webnotifications.serviceworker.enabled. By default, the corresponding entries in the Value column will be true. Double-clicking on each one will set it to false and you should not see any more offers of push notifications that allow you get alerts from web services like Yahoo Mail so your web browsing should suffer less of these intrusions.

A few more shell commands

Here are some Linux commands that I encountered in a feature article in the current issue of Linux User & Developer that I had not met before:

cd --

This returns you to the previous directory where you were before with having to go back through the folder hierarchy to get there and is handy if you are jumping around a file system and any other means is far from speedy.

lsb_release -a

It can be useful to uncover what version of a distro you have from the command line and the above works for distros as diverse as Linux Mint, Debian, Fedora (it automatically installs in Fedora 22 if it is not installed already, a more advanced approach than showing you the command like in Linux Mint or Ubuntu), openSUSE and Manjaro. These days, the version may not change too often but it still is good to uncover what you have.

yum install fedora-upgrade

This one can be run either with sudo or in a root session started with su and it is specific to Fedora. The command performs an upgrade of the Fedora distro itself and I wonder if the functionality has been ported to the dnf command that has taken over from yum. My experiences with that in Fedora 22 so far suggest that it should be the case though I need to check that further with the VirtualBox VM that I have created.

Toggling the appearance or non-appearance of the Firefox session exit dialogue box

One thing that I notice with Firefox installations in both Ubuntu and Linux Mint is that a dialogue box appears when closing down the web browser asking whether to save the open session or if you want to have a fresh session the next time that you start it up. Initially, I was always in the latter camp but there are times when I took advantage of that session saving feature for retaining any extra tabs containing websites to which I want to return or editor sessions for any blog posts that I still am writing; sometimes, composing the latter can take a while.

To see where this setting is located, you need to open a new tab and type about:config in the browser’s address bar. This leads to advanced browser settings so you need click OK in answer to a warning message before proceeding. Then, start looking for browser.showQuitWarning using the Search bar; it acts like a dynamic filter on screen entries until you get what you need. On Ubuntu and Linux Mint, the value is set to true but false is the default elsewhere; unlike Opera, Firefox generally does not save sessions by fault unless you tell it to that (at least, that has been my experience anyway). Setting true to false or vice versa will control the appearance or non-appearance of the dialogue box at browser session closure time.

Smarter file renaming using PowerShell

It seems that the Rename-Item commandlet in Powershell is a very useful tool when it comes to smarter renaming of files. Even text substitution is a possibility and what follows is an example that takes the output of the Dir command for listing the files in a directory and replaces hyphens with underscores in each one.

Dir | Rename-Item –NewName { $_.name –replace “-“,”_” }

The result is that something like the-file.txt becomes the_file.txt. This behaviour is reminiscent of the rename command found on Linux and UNIX systems, where regular expressions can be used like in the following example that has the same result as the above:

rename ‘s/-/_/g’ *

In both cases, you do need to be careful as to what files are in a directory for this though the wildcard syntax on Linux or UNIX will be more familiar who has worked with files via almost any command line. Another thing to watch in the UNIX world is that ** parses the whole directory structure and that could be something that is not wanted for much of the time.

All of this is a far cry from the capabilities of the ren or rename command used in the days of MS-DOS and what has become the legacy Windows command line. Apart from simple renaming, any attempt at tweaking a filename through substitution ended up with the extra string getting appended to filenames when I tried it. Thus, the Powershell option looks better in comparison.