Technology Tales

Adventures & experiences in contemporary technology

Removing a Julia package

5th October 2022

While I have been programming with SAS for a few decades and it remains a lynchpin in the world of clinical development in the pharmaceutical industry, other technologies like R and Python are gaining a foothold. Two years ago, I started to look at those languages with personal projects being a great way of facilitating this. In addition, I got to hear of Julia and got to try that too. That journey continues since I have put it into use for importing and backing up photos, and there are other possible uses too.

Recently, I updated Julia to version 1.8.2 but ran into a problem with the DataArrays package that I had installed so I decided to remove it since it was added during experimentation. The Pkg package that is used for package management is documented but I had not gotten to that so some web searching ensued. It turns out that there are two ways of doing this. One uses the REPL: after pressing the ] key, the following command gets issued:

rm DataArrays

When all is done, pressing the delete or backspace keys returns things to normal. This also can be done in a script as well as the REPL and the following line works in both instances:

using Pkg; Pkg.rm("DataArrays")

The semicolon is used to separate two commands issued in the same line but they can be on different lines or issued separately just as well. Naturally, DataArrays is just an example here so you just replace that with the name of whatever other package you need to remove. Since we can get carried away when downloading packages, there are times when a clean-up is needed to remove redundant packages so knowing how to remove any clutter is invaluable.

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Please be aware that comment moderation is enabled and may delay the appearance of your contribution.

  • All the views that you find expressed on here in postings and articles are mine alone and not those of any organisation with which I have any association, through work or otherwise. As regards editorial policy, whatever appears here is entirely of my own choice and not that of any other person or organisation.

  • Please note that everything you find here is copyrighted material. The content may be available to read without charge and without advertising but it is not to be reproduced without attribution. As it happens, a number of the images are sourced from stock libraries like iStockPhoto so they certainly are not for abstraction.

  • With regards to any comments left on the site, I expect them to be civil in tone of voice and reserve the right to reject any that are either inappropriate or irrelevant. Comment review is subject to automated processing as well as manual inspection but whatever is said is the sole responsibility of the individual contributor.